Guz Architects

Guz Architects seeks to produce refreshing architecture that is tranquil, inspired by nature, yet human in  scale.

Its projects both derive inspiration from, and relate closely to, nature. Structure, materials and technology are used to express as seamless a transition as possible between inside and outside. The resulting designs are both responsive and responsible to the site and its occupants, with consideration being given to the integration and preservation of the surrounding natural environment.

The practice makes extensive use of sustainable design technologies, and both passive and active design principles inform all design decisions with the intent to create long lasting, timeless architecture. As architects, they believe that they should help neutralise the effect of global warming incurred by their projects by planting trees wherever possible. 

As a company, it has purchased land in the UK and New Zealand, and so far has planted over 7,200 trees. It makes donations to the World Land Trust to preserve existing rainforest; and also Greenpeace, who are active in helping prevent deforestation globally.

Lastly, in order to make a happy home or residence, it believes the whole project and design process should be fun.

Guz Architects

portfolio

Guz Architects crowns a bungalow in the Farrer Road neighbourhood with a well-landscaped pavilion

Guz Architects crowns a bungalow in the Farrer Road neighbourhood with a well-landscaped pavilion

For better or worse, we live in a time when increasing urban density, diminished resources and climate change are challenging architects, including those practising in Southeast Asia. It leads them not just to rethink their approach to green design, but also to convince reluctant clients to join the cause – if, for no other reason, than that incorporating climate-appropriate features is a sensible and, in the long run, cost-effective thing to do.  For over 20 years now, Guz Wilkinson of Guz Architects has been grappling with this very issue, always searching, in one house after the other, for ways to harness the natural elements to cool, shade and even power. His latest project – a 10,400sqft manse in the Farrer Road neighbourhood of the Botanic Gardens that is shoehorned into an oddly narrow triangular plot – is yet another salvo in his ongoing quest to create homes that quietly connect occupants with nature, but without being overtly evangelical about the process. It helped that from the outset, the client’s brief was a fait accompli. “They like greenery and gardens, and…

Q&A with Guz Wilkinson, Guz Architects: A house benefits if there is greenery for it to sit in

Q&A with Guz Wilkinson, Guz Architects: A house benefits if there is greenery for it to sit in

You have developed for yourself a reputation of designing houses hidden among gardens. Why is it so important to you to keep going in this direction?  I love nature and, to me, a house benefits if there is greenery and gardens for it to sit in and interact with. I also strongly believe that a house should be designed for its environment, and in the tropics, that means good passive design i.e. big roof overhangs, natural cross ventilation and other cooling elements, such as pools, ponds and gardens. What are three things on your wishlist for Singapore in the area of environmental sustainability in the landed residential space? You shared with ADDRESS that you have recently written to the Minister for National Development, Desmond Lee, on changing the regulations for counting the land under roof overhangs as part of a site’s coverage. Can you elaborate more on this?  I wrote a letter to Minister Desmond Lee just three months ago, in September. I talked about how prior to 2019, URA’s site coverage guidelines for good-class bungalows (GCB) were set at…

Guz Architects designed a Good Class Bungalow in Holland that has successfully stood the test of time 

Guz Architects designed a Good Class Bungalow in Holland that has successfully stood the test of time 

Good design never dates. Ask any architect and they’ll tell you that while the aphorism is easy enough to understand, it is devilishly difficult to achieve. Yet, to look at Rikki Tikki House, a Good Class Bungalow by Guz Architects, is to behold a design that somehow manages to look fresh, contemporary and, most crucially, completely relevant a full 22 years after it was built.  Designed for a couple and their two young children, the Good Class Bungalow sits on a sloping, 1,413sqm triangular plot at the end of a cul-de-sac in Singapore’s tony Ewart Park. Simply put, it is quite resplendent with its cascading terraces, deeply set loggias and borders of thick greenery.  For its architect, Guz Wilkinson, the design was a watershed. Until then, the British designer had been working on black-and-white bungalows, still figuring out how to integrate the impact of tropical weather into the design of the Singaporean house. The brief for the 832sqm Rikki Tikki House – a project nickname that has somehow stuck – said nothing about style, mandating only four bedrooms and spaces…