MAKK Architects

Featured in various local and foreign magazines, MAKK Architects‘ projects range from interiors of offices, F&B outlets and retail to the architecture of landed houses. The practice strongly believes in seeing through the entire process from design to contract to construction completion, as every design decision will impact the final cost, space dynamics and hence, the inhabitants’ relationships. It does not subscribe to unnecessary ostentatiousness in the employment of finishes but believes that its true value lies in the understanding of the dynamics of architectural spaces and the chance of being able to provoke or evoke an emotive response.

​In view of this believe, it strives constantly to make every piece of work different, not for the sake of just being different but because every client differs in habitual practices, idiosyncrasies and behaviours, not to  mention varying relational patterns and dynamics. These differences are evident in the projects completed and the current undergoing projects.

​The practice does not believe in a particular style or a particular signature form, but rather, pays attention to the details in the inhabitants’ relationship that would affect or effect a change in the dynamics. In every project, there usually is one or more element/s that capture the varying “idiosyncratic” moments of its owner, and the outcome of the architectural form and interior space is nothing more than a relational manifestations. Though the practice does not believe in one particular style, which usually limits and inhibits the possibilities of design itself, it recognises the emotive value that each architectural style inherently carries and will not hesitate to employ the appropriate style to complement the character of its inhabitants.

​In view of a constant evolution in the ideology and thinking in the practice, the principal architect, Lee May Anne, involves herself in the teaching of this discipline at the Architecture faculty of the National University of Singapore.

MAKK Architects

portfolio

MAKK Architects defines a semi-detached house in Ang Mo Kio with a series of interlocking barrel vaults 

MAKK Architects defines a semi-detached house in Ang Mo Kio with a series of interlocking barrel vaults 

A quick glance at MAKK Architects’ latest completed project might yield the impression that the designer recently went on a whirlwind tour of cathedrals across Europe, or that the owners are deeply religious. Its Principal, Lee May Anne, immediately bursts into peals of laughter at the suggestions. “No and no!” she exclaims mirthfully. “But it is the first thing that everyone says when I show them the house.” The reason for these assumptions is obvious. The massing of the semi-detached house, located in Ang Mo Kio, is defined by a series of interlocking barrel vaults of various heights and widths. To Lee, the explanation boils down to mathematics, “I like complex geometry because it gives you the possibility of creating and crafting a lot of incidental spaces, which I love.” Complex feels about right. A virtual walk-through of the residence via floorplans, photographs and the to-scale model Lee painstakingly built had this writer all twisted up in knots. Another contributing factor is the life stages of the occupants. The owners are parents to four sons who range in age between…

A pair of A-line volumes define the façade and massing of this semi-detached home in Upper Thomson

A pair of A-line volumes define the façade and massing of this semi-detached home in Upper Thomson

Lee May Anne likes to say that her one-woman studio MAKK Architects has no signature form or style. Yet, even the most casual glance through her portfolio quickly reveals that her demur is an artful dodge that deflects the intellectual rigour and thoughtfulness, alongside a dash of playfulness, that have infused her work to date.  Exhibit A is this new semi-detached family home in the Upper Thomson neighbourhood for the owner of a landscaping company, the doyenne of a garden spa, and their young daughter.  On a street replete with renovated terrace homes, Lee’s design catches the eye, not least for the facade: an unexpected three-dimensional form anchored by the silhouettes of two mini A-line “houses” on the second floor that create the impression that they are little homes hanging, like the houses of Cuenca in Spain, off the side of a cliff. Referencing Laugier’s Primitive Hut, Lee says, “The design is as much a celebration of nature as it is about integrating light, water, plants and wind into the architecture.”  Formally, the 432sqm home is oriented along a north-south…