Studio Wills + Architects

Studio Wills + Architects is a Singapore-based architectural studio of environment and experience design with a focus in making a better environment by discovering the potentials of present conditions. The aspiration to enhance the environment brings a unique approach of searching the extraordinary in the ordinary, everyday life, through understanding of sensitive observations, thoughtful making, responsive teamwork and active collaborations.

Studio Wills + Architects

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At 35sqm, this micro-apartment in 38 I Suites by Studio Wills + Architects is its smallest project yet 

At 35sqm, this micro-apartment in 38 I Suites by Studio Wills + Architects is its smallest project yet 

OCTOBER SPECIAL | Small apartment interior design series, story 2 of 3 To watch any YouTube episode of Never Too Small, a Melbourne-based collective committed to the small footprint design of apartments, is to realise the ingenuity of the human mind. But it is also how, in the right hands of a sympathetic designer, less is always so much more. Each six- to eight-minute episode clearly demonstrates that there can be, surprisingly, an indirect correlation between the size of a small apartment and the quality of life of its occupants.  Yet, one cannot help but wonder just what must have gone through William Ng’s mind when he was approached to work on this 35sqm micro-apartment in 38 I Suites in Ipoh Lane. The architect admitted that while his firm Studio Wills + Architects seeks out unusual briefs, and building or apartment types, this is by far the smallest project they’ve taken on to date.  Like a Jenga puzzle  The original floor plan divided the pocket-sized space into the quotidian bedroom and en suite, both of which were segregated by a…

Q&A with William Ng, Studio Wills + Architects: Consider how a multi-gen family might change while designing their home

Q&A with William Ng, Studio Wills + Architects: Consider how a multi-gen family might change while designing their home

Many, if not all, of the landed properties you’ve designed are for multi-generational families. What is one piece of advice you can share about designing one? We observed, in many multi-generational houses, that the family composition and profile of its occupiers change over time; existing family members leave and new family members join the household. One piece of advice we can share is to take this into consideration and think about how the building can be designed to respond to it. You talk about how important it is to make a better living environment by discovering the potential of present conditions. Can you share one example of how you did it in a project? Let’s take the example Project #3, a multi-generational house where the need to accommodate many individuals within a house led to the strategy of fragmentation — the breaking down of a big building mass into smaller ones, such that every individual has their own personal space. This strategy gave rise to pockets of spaces, either interior or exterior, between these personal spaces, which are a delight…

Studio Wills + Architects uses clever shapes and curated materials to overcome the restricted site of this modernist home

Studio Wills + Architects uses clever shapes and curated materials to overcome the restricted site of this modernist home

Often, the best design emerges from the strictest of constraints. This three-storey house by Studio Wills + Architects is an excellent example and a testament to the architect’s deft hands. Sitting on the highest point of the Adelphi Park Estate in Singapore’s central area, the home’s 6,199sqft plot enjoys a sweeping view of its low-rise landed neighbourhood and the distant Central Catchment Nature Reserve. However, the elevated plot also has a 7.5m road buffer setback, imposed by the local planning authorities, along the length of the site, which considerably limits its buildable footprint into a narrow trapezoid with a tapered point. Adding to this constraint was the clients’ extensive programmatic brief. Housing a family of four with occasional visits from the grandparents, its must-haves included a living and dining area served by a kitchen and back-of-the-house facilities, a family room, three bedrooms with ensuite bathrooms, one master suite and two home offices/study areas. Other requirements were a sheltered carpark for six cars, an entertainment room that fits a pool table, a bar and home theatre. These had to be arranged…